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IGNOU BEGC-133 - British Literature

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British Literature

BEGC–133 covers the works of great British writers, Macbeth by Shakespeare, Far from the Madding Crowd by Thomas Hardy, Arms and the Man by George Bernard Shaw, and Morte D'Arthur by Alfred Tennyson. By reading these books, students learn and understand the various issues of governance, the state and society, human emotions, and resolving problems through peaceful means.

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IGNOU BEGC-133 Code Details

  • University IGNOU (Indira Gandhi National Open University)
  • Title British Literature
  • Language(s)
  • Code BEGC-133
  • Subject English
  • Degree(s) BAG
  • Course Core Courses (CC)

IGNOU BEGC-133 English Topics Covered

Block 1 - Shakespeare: Macbeth

  • Unit 1 - Macbeth: an Introduction
  • Unit 2 - Macbeth: Part-I
  • Unit 3 - Macbeth: Part-II
  • Unit 4 - Macbeth: Critical Responses

Block 2 - Thomas Hardy: Far from the Madding Crowd

  • Unit 1 - The Novel in Britain: an Introduction
  • Unit 2 - Thomas Hardy's Life and Writings
  • Unit 3 - Far from the Madding Crowd: Summary and Analysis
  • Unit 4 - Far from the Madding Crowd: Critical Analysis

Block 3 - George Bernard Shaw: Arms and the Man

  • Unit 1 - George Bernard Shaw: An Introduction
  • Unit 2 - Arms and the Man: Summary and Analysis-1
  • Unit 3 - Arms and the Man: Summary and Analysis-2
  • Unit 4 - Arms and the Man: Themes and Concerns

Block 4 - Alfred Tennyson: "Morte Dי Arthur"

  • Unit 1 - The Victorian age
  • Unit 2 - "Morte d’ Arthur": Reading the Text
  • Unit 3 - Text and Analysis of “Morte d’ Arthur”
  • Unit 4 - "Morte d’ Arthur": Themes and Symbols
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IGNOU BEGC-133 (July 2023 - January 2024) Assignment Questions

SECTION A I Explain the following passages with reference to the context. 1. “I have no spur To prick the sides of my intent, but only Vaulting ambition, which o’erleaps itself And falls on th’ other.” 2. “Out, damned spot: out I say! One, Two: Why then ’tis time to do’t. Hell is murky. Fie, My Lord, fie! A soldier, and affear’d? What need we fear who knows it, when none can call our power to accompt”? 3. “He did it like an operatic tenor—a regular handsome fellow, with flashing eyes and lovely moustache, shouting a war-cry and charging like Don Quixote at the windmills. We nearly burst with laughter at him; but when the sergeant ran up as white as a sheet, and told us they’d sent us the wrong cartridges, and that we couldn’t fire a shot for the next ten minutes, we laughed at the other side of mouths.” 4. “The old order changeth, yielding place to new, And God fulfils himself in many ways, Lest one good custom should corrupt the world. Comfort thyself: what comfort is in me? I have lived my life, and that which I have done May He within himself make pure!” Section B II. Write short notes on the following: a. Characterisation in Far from the Madding Crowd. b. The ‘Banquet Scene’ in Macbeth. c. Tennyson as a representative poet of Victorian England. d. Bernard Shaw and the ‘discussion play’. III. Write short essays on the following: a. “Arms and the Man is considered to be an ‘anti-romantic comedy’”. Do you agree? b. What are the main themes of Tennyson’s poem “Morte d’Arthur’? Briefly explain the allegorical significance of the poem. Section C IV Write a brief critical appreciation of Thomas Hardy’s novel Far from the Madding Crowd, bringing out the significance of the landscape of Wessex in the novel.

IGNOU BEGC-133 (July 2022 - January 2023) Assignment Questions

SECTION A I. Explain the following passages with reference to the context. 1. “Stay, you imperfect speakers, tell me more. By Sinel’s death I know I am Thane of Glamis; But how of Cawdor? The Thane of Cawdor lives, A prosperous gentleman; and to be king stands not within the prospect of belief, No more than to be Cawdor. Say from whence You owe this strange intelligence? Or why Upon this blasted heath you stop our way With such prophetic greeting.” 2. “Is this a dagger which I see before me, The handle toward my hand? Come, let me clutch thee: - I have thee not, and yet I see thee still. Art thou not, fatal vision, sensible To feeling as to sight? Or art thou but A dagger of the mind? A false creation, Proceeding from the heat-oppressed brain?” 3. “How strange it is to be talked to in such a way! You know, I’ve always gone on like that. I mean the noble attitude and the thrilling voice. I did it when I was a tiny child to my nurse. She believed in it. I do it before my parents. They believe in it.” 4. “The old order changeth, yielding place to new, And God fulfils himself in many ways, Lest one good custom should corrupt the world. Comfort thyself: what comfort is in me? I have lived my life, and that which I have done May He within himself make pure!” Section B II. Write short notes on the following: a. Thomas Hardy and the fictional region of Wessex. b. Hardy’s classification of his own novels. c. The ‘Porter Scene’ in Macbeth. d. Tennyson as a representative poet of Victorian England. III. Write short essays on the following: a. Justify the title of Bernard Shaw’s play Arms and the Man. b. Explain the significance of the symbols employed in ‘Morte d’Arthur’. Section C IV Discuss Hardy’s approach to the natural world, as expressed in Far from the Madding Crowd.
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